Did you know that people become more connected emotionally through laughter? In fact, the wonderful hormones that shoot off in the  brain during laughter are similar to romantic hormones that trigger attraction. Yep. So I challenge the old addage, “The way to man’s heart is through his stomach.” What about this? “The best way to a man’s heart is through his funny bone.”?

And humor is the perfect ‘tease’ too. A little bit of flirting here. Some subtle romantic tension there. Ah…like a good recipe 😉

To be honest, I have a tendency to enjoy romantic scenes that are either comical or intense. So… a cross between Mary Connealy and Julie Lessman 😉 OR, I’ll throw Janet Dean into the loop, are some of my favorite kinds. In fact, Janet’s new book The Substitute Bride brings in a bit of humor with some kisses too. Fun, delightful, and sweet. Ah, sweet kisses. Now we’re talkin’. To learn more about Janet’s books, visit her website at www.janetdean.net

So Janet, 

What do you think makes a great kissing scene? Why?

 Depending on the mood of the characters and the stage of their relationship, kissing scenes vary and should. To me, all great kissing scenes elicit strong emotion, making characters and readers feel tender, loving, joyful or even angry.

I find a fun moment an excellent way to show sexual tension. I hope you do too. In the following scene from The Substitute Bride, the kiss between Elizabeth and Ted Logan is the culmination of some silliness. Silliness that suddenly turns serious.

Ted found Elizabeth in the kitchen, putting on an apron over his pants she still wore from gathering eggs that morning. “Planning on making those delicious biscuits of yours?”

Her mouth gaped. “You want biscuits?”

The thought put a knot in his stomach. “I’m hungry for a batch.” He gave her his most innocent look. “Want some help?”

“And you want to help?” She cocked her head at him, a smile tugging at her lips. “In the middle of your workday?”

With one field left to plant with corn, he should hitch up King and Queen, but his suggestion appeared to cheer her. “If you don’t mind.”

She examined his palms. “If you wash those hands.”

Well, at least she was touching him. A good sign peace had been restored. “Yes, ma’am,” he said, heading for the sink.

Suspicion clouded her dazzling blue eyes, as if she didn’t believe a word he’d said, but Elizabeth handed him an apron. He didn’t hanker to don it but no point in making a fuss and take a chance of ruining the harmony between them.

She reached for a crock then opened the door hiding the flour bin. “Measure two cups of flour.” She handed him a knife. “Use this to level it.”

He fumbled with the cup and knife.

“Do it like this,” she said, showing him how, then handing the knife back to him. “Add another cup of flour.”

With her standing so near, he could barely absorb her directions but somehow managed to dump the flour into the bowl. By the sparkle in her eye and the smile playing around her lips, she enjoyed bossing him. She looked…happy. Why hadn’t he tried harder to give her joy? With planting and all the chores to do, he’d neglected his wife. He wouldn’t make that mistake again.

She thrust a spoon at him. “Add four teaspoons of baking powder.”

And so it went with her giving orders and him following directions until he was wrist high in dough, his hands a mucky mess. He shot her a grin. “This is fun, kind of like playing in the mud. Care to join me.”

She rolled up her sleeves and dove in, squishing the dough between her fingers.

“A nice way to take out your frustrations,” Ted said.

“Why do you think I’ve gotten so good at biscuits?”

He chuckled. Within minutes, they battled with their fingers over territory in the bowl. She tried to shove him aside. He raised dough-globbed fingers in a sinister pose sending her into peals of laughter.

Next thing Ted knew, she streaked a doughy finger across his cheek then stepped back, grinning at him. Well, he couldn’t let that go. He grabbed her wrist. She ducked and tried to pull away, but he managed to draw a circle on her forehead.

She retaliated with a batter-smeared mustache. “You look ever so handsome,” she teased.

“You’d look mighty good with one yourself.” She scrambled out of reach, but he lunged for her waist, twisted her around and smeared the dough above her lip. “Now your face matches those pants you’re wearing.”

Things went downhill from there, giggling and making a mess even Tippy wouldn’t touch.

Trapping his bride in his arms, Ted lowered his head and planted a gooey kiss on her lips. Amazingly she kissed him back, dissipating the humor, leaving them both breathing deep and staring into each other’s eyes with the beat of Ted’s heart thumping in his ears.

“I had no idea you were so fond of biscuits, Mr. Logan.”

“From now on, Mrs. Logan, I’ll take my biscuits raw.”

Wonderful scene, Janet. Actually, it’s a great story in general. I just finished reading it last night and Ted is SUCH a lovable hero. Thanks for bringing your humor, romance, and fun to the post today.

Kissing Quote of the Day:

This quote is in answer to this question: How do adults learn how to kiss?

“You learn it right on the spot when the gooshy feelings get the best of you.” (Doug, 7)

Inspirational Kissing Quote:

There is no greater romance than being so greatly loved, so immeasurably adored, that you are secure within that love. Human love can only imitate a fraction of God’s perfect love and with that in mind, here is Ephesians 3:18-21
And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, 18 may have power, together with all the Lord’s people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, 19 and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God.    20 Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, 21 to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen.
Stop by tomorrow with guest, Margaret Daley.
 
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23 thoughts on “

    1. I’m with Sherrinda and Renee. A GUY in the kitchen! With his hands in dough? Whoa. Move over Prince CHarming.

      Thanks for being on today, Janet. Kissing should be fun – intense too in spades, but a little bit of silliness goes a long way

      Like

  1. Oh, Janet, I LOVED that scene and the whole book in general because you are one of those rare authors who can crank up the heat with a simple kiss, look, or biscuit tussle!! I really noticed that when I read The Substitute Bride and found my pulse racing a number of times over the most innocent things. I think I need to study all of your books a little more closely to learn how to do that, girl, because the “less is more” style is definitely fun … especially in YOUR books!

    Hugs,
    Julie

    Hugs,
    Julie

    Like

  2. Oh, Janet, I LOVED that scene and the whole book in general because you are one of those rare authors who can crank up the heat with a simple kiss, look, or biscuit tussle!! I really noticed that when I read The Substitute Bride and found my pulse racing a number of times over the most innocent things. I think I need to study all of your books a little more closely to learn how to do that, girl, because the “less is more” style is definitely fun … especially in YOUR books!

    Hugs,
    Julie

    Like

    1. Janet,
      I agree with you on the cookie dough kiss. Definitely better. Yum. Two for the price of one. A kiss and chocolate. Oh yeah!!

      The Substitute Bride was a wonderful story, Janet. I finished it last night just before I put up your post. I REALLY liked Ted. So much. I liked Elizabeth too, but there was something about Ted, and his deep desire to love her, that was so appealing. He was such a good guy. can’t wait to learn about more of your books.

      Like

  3. I’m glad the kiss made you smile, Casey. The fun part is that right as they’re kissing, Ted’s in-laws arrive and get their first glimpse of Ted’s new wife. Can you imagine the horror of her wearing pants and a biscuit dough mustache? LOL

    Janet

    Like

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